New York Troopers - History
Preserving the Past for Those Who Follow
 
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WOODSTOCK MUSIC FESTIVAL - AUGUST 15, 16 & 17, 1969 

All Woodstock photos & documents courtesy of retired

TROOPER ROBERT FAUGH




 
Of the hundreds of thousands of people who attended the Woodstock festival, only 109 were arrested. 
All but four were for drugs with no instance of violence noted. Troopers booked 270 people who were either on their way to Bethel or returning home on 408 charges and confiscated a substantial amount of drugs.
 
 
 TROOPER BOB FAUGH LEAVING SP HIGHLAND FOR DUTY AT WOODSTOCK - AUGUST 1969
 



 
 

 

 
 

 

 

 
PAY OUT TO PERFORMERS; Jimi Hendrix $32,000 / The Band $15,000 / Janis Joplin $15,000 / Canned Heat $12,000 / Jan Baez $10,000 / Crosby, Stills Nash $10,000 / Creed Clear Revival $10,000 / Grateful Dead $75,00 / Richie Havens $6,000 / Arlo Guthrie $5,000 / Incredible String Band $4,500 / Ravi Shankar $4.500 / Tim Hardin $2,000 / Santana $1500
 

 
    SHA NA NA
 


Thirty two bands were listed to play.  Iron Butterfly failed to show up. Jimmie Hendrix on Monday morning closed the concert with the Star Spangled Banner to a sparse crowd. John Sebastian was
was enlisted to perform when other bands could not get in due to heavy traffic. Richie Havens song "Freedom" was totally improvised and drew so many encores, he ran out of songs to sing. Country Joe McDonald was forced to fill in and then played along with the Fish on day 3. 
 

 

 

 

 
 


 

 

 

 

WOODSTOCK TODAY
 

 
BOB & LINDA FAUGH VISIT WOODSTOCK IN 2010
 
 

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The idea for the festival came from band manager Michael Lang & Artie Kornfeld, a songwriter turned record company executive. They wanted to raise enough money to build a recording studio in Woodstock, New York.

There was no suitable site in Woodstock so they sought another location. A friend of farmer Max Yasgur who owned a motel in White Lake struck a deal with Max to use his farm for $5000.00. No records were found for a permit being issued by Bethel, N.Y. for the festival to be held on the farm.

Though the festival mood was anti war, ironically the festival would most likely have turned to tragedy without the U.S. Army, who airlifted in food, medical teams & performers. 
 

 
The New York Times reported that 186,000 tickets had been sold prior to the concert. At $18.00 each - that was in excess of 33 million dollars. Organizers said they were broke at concerts end.
 

 

 

Civilian, NYS Police & National Guard helicopters were used to transport performers and food in and the sick & overdoses out.
 
 

 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 Members of the Troop F & K Narco units at work.
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   JANIS JOPLIN
 

    JEFFERSON AIRPLANE
 

   JEFFERSON AIRPLANE
 

 

 

 
 

 

 
Logistics - Two companies provided 650 porta-johns & 200 urinal spaces. This number was planned to serve 60,000 persons. Servicing the Johns was impossible due to crowds, heavy traffic & mud. One john serving 700 people. 

Food for Love, the company hired to provide food based projections on 50,000 people a day for 3 days. Bread - 30,000 loaves / Marshmallows 10,000 pkgs / Peanut butter 1,500 pounds / milk 20,000 gals / cheese 5,000 pounds / coffee 2,000 pounds/ ice 450,000 pounds / napkins 600,000 / eating utensils 900,000

The NY National Guard came in and set up feeding stations . you couldn't find a loaf of bread in Sullivan, Orange or Ulster Counties that weekend. Local citizens began making hundreds of sandwiches providing food to festival visitors.
 

 

 

Although the festival was remarkably peaceful given the number of people and conditions involved, there were three recorded fatalities: one from a heroine overdose & another when a man sleeping in a hayfield was run over by a tractor. There were also two births recorded at the event ( one in a car caught in traffic) and the other in a hospital after being airlifted by helicopter and four miscarriages. 

Not withstanding their personality, their dress and their ideas, they were and they are the most courteous, considerate and well behaved group of kids I have ever been in contact with in my 24 years of police work reported Lou Yank, Police Chief of local Monticello, NY

During and after the festival, Troopers recovered 800 stolen cars, vans, motor cycles and buses.

Woodstock gave virtually everyone involved - ticket holders, gate crashers , musicians, doctors, troopers, sheriffs & local police - a sense of shared humanity and cooperation. Trying to get through the weekend, people played nice with one another, which was only sensible. Musicians performed for the biggest audience of their lives. Townspeople, civic groups, legion posts and National Guard pitched in to keep people fed & healthy.

No one , The New York Times reported called the cops "Pigs"
 

 
 

 
  A detail of Troopers were assigned to Max's farm, when he received threats that his farm would be burned by angry neighbors. Cows in the area failed to give milk for two weeks. 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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